Rosa Aiello, Mateusz Choróbski, Isabelle Cornaro, Jan Domicz, Daniel Koniusz, Piotr Łakomy, Sami Schlichting

Spoilage#2:Narrating what remains

14.9 - 5.10 2019

'What was here to be found was not a thing. Things separate from their stories have no meaning. They are only shapes. Of a certain size and colour. A certain weight. When their meaning has become lost to us they no longer have a name. The story on the other hand can never be lost from its place in the world for it is that place'

Cormac McCarthy, The Crossing, 1994


Spolia is a category of material objects which do not consist of elements defined by a static spectrum of qualities such as shape, size, time or place. The name itself carries several meanings. The term was commonly used around the year 1500 in Rome by artists and antiquarians who reused antiquities and their fragments to produce new objects of aesthetic value. Therefore, in Latin the word spolia means anything „stripped” from someone or something, revealing in this way its older military meaning of „things taken by force.” Knowing that, we can understand that what defines particular remains as spolia is an act which they underwent. It is the act of spoliation that opens up the potential of narration and history for a cluster of otherwise illegible fragments. This brings up another linguistic reference, which points towards a modern understanding of spoils: the word rediviva which underlines the ambiguous status of the act of spoliation as „rebirth” or „regeneration” of certain material objects. Spoliation therefore is essentially a twofold process of extracting fragments, materials, pieces from an existing man-made object of any scale — from sculptures, to buildings — and embedding them in a new construction for reasons yet to be defined.

[excerpt from 'Spolia and the modern' by Adam Przywara | 'Spoilage' publication, September 2018]


'Spoilage' published in September 2018 was initially formed as an exhibition translated into publication - exhibition that never happened, which relates to works that do not form the final image, works that will never fully be finished, woks that will never happen. 

'Spoilage:Narrating what remains' introduces 7 site specific installations in the frame of the initial Spoilage publication project. 


Rosa Aiello, Mateusz Choróbski, Isabelle Cornaro, Jan Domicz, Daniel Koniusz, Piotr Łakomy, Sami Schlichting - Spoilage#2:Narrating what remains